Corrie White Photography

Corrie White Photography

The splashes from droplets impacting jets create truly mesmerizing liquid sculptures. Corrie White is one of the masters of this type of high-speed macro photography. Her work captures the instantaneous battles between viscosity, surface tension, and inertia. The fantastic structure seen here through the falling droplets is created by a series of drops timed so that the later ones strike the Worthington jet produced by the initial drop’s impact.

corrie whitee1

Bio:

I have a passion for water drop photography! A macro art form where you can mold a figure made of liquids, and where each one is totally unique. This type of photography lets you experience what is usually invisible to the human eye.

I was born in The Netherlands and currently make my home near London, Ontario in Canada. Photography has been an interest of mine from an early age and macro photography has always had a special appeal for me. I am basically self-taught and learned water drop photography from some tutorials online. A lot of my water drops posted here were done manually with a medicine dropper and a good sense of timing. The more complex forms are now done by using Mumford’s Time Machine and the Drip Kit which allow me to create some very unique and fascinating figures. The colours I use come from food dyes and various flash gels. The forms of the water and milk shapes are pure and unedited.

I have made some discoveries in water drop photography, one of them being the unique three drop splash as in “Tiny Dancer”. Another is multiple exposures in water drops. This is where the drops are falling in the same area but while I am panning the camera, I can get more than one splash in the same frame, such as my “Liquid Flowers”. I pushed the drip kit to the limits by creating a splash with a bubble-type base caused by an extra large drop as in “Suspended”. I have combined soap film and water drops simultaneously as well as the water drop/liquid flow combo as you see in “Coral Sea Dreaming”. One method I started using was to color white milk splashes using colored gels on the flash guns which made some very colorful forms. I’m always looking for the unique and trying to come up with something that has never been done before.

The refractions in the drop come from a picture hung upside down, about 8 to 10 inches behind the drop.

The refractions in the drop come from a picture hung upside down, about 8 to 10 inches behind the drop.

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